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.m. eastern here on c- span. ," ours weeks "newsmakers guest is the ceo of heritage action for america. he talks about his organization's agenda and its position on issues pertaining to health care and immigration. here's a preview. [video clip] >> in this environment right now, it is very difficult to handle immigration the way we should be. which is bypassing piecemeal pieces of legislation, getting the border secure. we also have a gigantic imbalance between labor supply and labor demand. all of those questions do not require amnesty. you can get all of the economic benefits that people talk about in fixing our broken immigration system without giving amnesty at this time. that is the position we support. unfortunately in this environment right now, the moment something passes the house, the pressure on immigration, which has dissipated over the last couple of weeks and months, will immediately be back in the forefront. >> you can watch the entire interview with michael needham of heritage action form for america on newsmakers -- on "newsmakers" sunday at 10:00 a.m. eastern and 6:00 p.m
and put a platform together that focuses on them. not everybody in america wants a business and money is everything to them. a lot of folks want to spend time with their families. work in community groups. spend time at their church. we, as republicans, believe that is a good thing. we do not talk about it. and we do not talk to them. it is to take a page out of our book and start putting forth an agenda of ideas to raise up folks who want to vote for us. you saw the last election. they did not want to vote for president obama. but at least he went and talked to them and about them. we did not do that. we marginalized them. first and foremost, we need to reject the idea that if we build the economy, everybody will be fine. most people have holes in their boats. we need to talk about people who have holes in their boats. we all do. we all need help from each other. the second thing is we need to talk less about the culture. he people who do this is those who do not want to talk about culture in the first place. as a result, do not engage as we have in this party. i will give you an exa
. -- andrybody in america money is everything to them. a lot of folks want to spend time with their families. work and community groups. spend time at their church. we as republicans believe that is a good inc.. we do not talk about it. and we do not talk to them. -- that is a good thing. it is to take a page out of our book and start putting forth an upnda of ideas to raise folks who want to vote for us. you side and the last election. they do not want to vote for president obama. but at least he went and talked to them and about them. we did not do that. we marginalized them. --st and foremost, we need first and foremost, we need to reject the idea that if we build to becoming, everybody will be fine. -- if we build the economy, everybody will be fine. most people have holes in their boats. we need to talk about people who have holes in their boats. we all do. we all need help from each other. [applause] the second inc. as we be to talk less about the culture area -- thing is we need to talk less about the culture. the people who do this is who do not want to talk about culture in the firs
of america through the senses. the population reached 17 million in 26 states. we consistently see 30%. slaves #2.5 million, which is almost 15% of the population, and new orleans joins the list of the largest cities in the united states. we heard about the tylers and their attitude toward slavery. give us an indication of what was happening in 1840. >> this is a tremendous time of sexual tension. we like to think the country is divided regionally, that everyone in the north is anti slavery and everyone in the south is proslavery. it is not that simple. people in the north benefited from slavery and the slave trade until it was ended. they now move into a different economic arena. they no longer need slavery, and slippery as a threat to them because of the free labor system in the north, and the kinds of the economy that is needed to preserve institutions in the north are different from those in the south, so what is happening in congress is both groups want to control legislation, because if you are in more industrialized regions, we want certain parts of laws passed to preserve the
with paula broadwell, he is reinventing himself in america's media capital, taking a teaching gig. >> life doesn't stop with such a mistake and can and must go on. >> reporter: petraeus joins a long line of officials who were involved in scandals. public reasonings expert has covered everyone to -- take immediate responsibility. apologize to the right people, his wife and the american people. and remove yourself from controversy, meaning don't fight to stay on as cia director. it didn't hurt that the president granted petraeus a graceful exit. >> he has provided this country an extraordinary service. >> what could be a more attractive thing than that kind of sendoff. >> reporter: but his past hasn't been perfect. he was set to make $150,000 for teaching students three hours a week. >> my initial reaction was outrageous. >> reporter: the doctor says most would get $3,000 for teaching that seminar, and the school's mission is to provide an affordable session. >> once again, it's how he is quick on his feet. i would say before the ink was dry on that first story there was no story. >> reporte
just in time for students to return to school. why she says there is a war on boys in america's classics. schools hostile to young boys. we're going to debate it "fox & friends" hour one starts right now. >> mike, mike, mike, mike, mike, what day is it, mike? >> it's "fox & friends." [rooster crowing] >> clayton: good morning, welcome to "fox & friends." keep track of what day it is, mike. >> mike: it's not hump day it's saturday. it's so interesting to bed in the new studio with the new curvey couch it's so clean. unreal. >> clayton: does this studio look familiar? >> mike: this was mike's studio back in the day. >> mike: not that far back. >> clayton: you guys built this studio. [ buzzer ] >> clayton: coming up in the show a little bit mike was already asking me about this a device that let's you capture audio of anything going on in the day when spousal fights when the wife says to you i never said that you will be able it play this device back on your wrist and say honey, let's listen back to our fight a couple hours ago. >> mike: is this a good thing? >> ainsley: maybe no
there. what is great about what we've seen with america over the last several years is how resilient we are. after the boston bombings, for example. the next day, folks are out there, going to ball games, making sure we are not reacting in a way that somehow shuts us down. >> right. >> and that is the right reaction. terrorist depend on the fact we will be terrorized. we are going to live our lives and the odds of people dying in a tourist attack are still a lot ,ower than in a car accident unfortunately, but there are things we can do to make sure that we're keeping the pressure on these networks, that will try to injure americans. it is the first thing i think of when i wake up in the last thing i think about before going to bed, is keeping americans safe. host: that was the president last night on "the tonight show" with jay leno. ken walsh has written this piece available online that the president's appearance on "the tonight show", part of his effort to expand the presidencies outreach more widely than ever. other presidents have limited themselves to more traditional approaches su
. >>peter: no one knows more about corporate america than you. you said this is akin to what in terms of corporations? >> the turn around specialist. >>peter: when those turn-around guys come in, don't they have targs -- targets? don't they say your contract is going to end unless you bring our expenses down x percent or you increase our numbers up this way? >> i don't know whether that is in this guy's contract. he's got a thee-year contract. -- a three-year contract. ask yourself is it not cheaper to spend a half million dollars on a high-priced professional than going into bankruptcy. >>peter: what should we be doing on that? great question po pose today. you'll be posing other questions and giving more answers at 9:20. >> i'm free with my opinion. >>peter: they are free but they're worth a lot. how does the government plan to stop leaks at the n.s.a.? the plan to replace people with machines. really? okay. then just can't get the kid to sleep? how these interactive pajamas can change your life if you're a parent. i think it's working. good morning. ♪ ♪ ♪ [ female announcer ]
contributions for america. this panel focuses on the economic effects of naturalization. from dallas, this is about one hour. >> a pleasure to be here. i worked for closed with president bush when he was in the white house trying to advance immigration reform in the last battle and so it's a pleasure for me to be back in his beautiful new house, talking about immigration. so thank you to this institute. i want to harken back as we get started to the ceremony that we saw this morning combat incredible moving ceremony because what we're going to talk about here today is not just out immigration is good for america, but have naturalization and citizenship actually even ups the ante and makes immigrants even more beneficial for the united states. to benefit themselves, but it's also a benefit for the country. so the very people we saw this morning when they came in the door, they were great for america but as they went out the door their even more. they will be even more of an asset. we will delve deeper into that. what i want to give him a couple of minutes at a moderate is framing a li
, is the drug cartels and the violent side of is a demand for drugs in the united states of america. whether they have a submarine, like i have seen in colombia. it is a violent place when you have armed members bringing drugs across the border into our country. i do not excuse any action that .ook place but to somehow think it is not dangerous when cartel members are bringing drugs up to this country is not an adequate reading of the situation on the border, and i visit it all the time. said, i think the answer to our border control is technology. you have a point about additional border patrol. one of the things we need more of is customs people so we can .xpedite traffic back and forth there are some of us here old enough to remember we used to be able to walk across and have and walkedgales back. think about doing that today. you bring up problems on the border, and with this surveillance capability, we will people back,keep and then we will be able to send these teams out. finally, the coyotes. we know these coyotes are the worst scum of the earth people, and they are bringing people it
told this reporter the great thing about america is there's all these jobs. that's not something americans think, like there's all these jobs. the other thing on these immigrants said was, the other great thing about america is that if you work hard you can get ahead in this country. >> i was here in texas a month or two ago, and it was a small business, just one little taxi come and the driver was an immigrant. i asked him about his experience when he came to america. he said when i arrived it was like i was woken up and i had these opportunities. >> i think it's kind of ambitious drive that is unique to immigrants. let's face it, there's -- 99% of the people in the world never move from where the girl. watauga but the 1% of people are ambitious enough and courageous enough to leave your homeland is a very courageous thing to do. so this is as an economist, i just think this is one of the kind of innate advantages of having immigration. number one, they are preselected for kind of economic success. and number two, this gets back to my point about china, let's face it, the bigges
of the united states of america" is a biography and portrait of each first lady. it is now available for the discounted price of $12.95 plus shipping and can be found at c- span.org/products. the c-span town hall meeting that discusses the future of political parties. following that, nancy pelosi. after that, a town hall meeting with senator john mccain. >> this is a c-span townhall. you good tos away, have more of your say. during congress's recess, tuesday, wednesday, and thursday night on c-span, we are looking at public politics and talking to you about positions. welcome to c-span town hall tonight. we will ask you about the future of your political party. who is the future leader, the likely presidential candidate, and maybe it is somebody that is not necessarily yet on the national scene. a couple of ways for you to participate, by phone. we will open up the lines now. make sure you mute your television and radio when you call in. you can also use twitter. we will read tweets from members of congress who are back in their home states and districts for the august recess. some p
suspended recently are from latin america. >> rafael explains why this is significant when it comes to the use of performance enhancing drugs. >> reporter: at this baseball academy in dominican republic, this future of baseball is literally in the making. these young players have a common dream, to make it in the major leagues. they have something else in common. they all idolize alex rodriguez and are devastated by his suspension. >> translator: it's tough for us dominicans and difficult. we're talking about one of the greatest players. a star that shines no longer. to retire the name is something that's very sad for us. >> reporter: rodriguez born in new york to dominican parents was suspend monday for 211 regular season games amid allegations using performance enhancing drugs. 12 other players agreed to 50 game suspension without pay. the only nonhispanic in the group got a 65-game suspension. he and rodriguez are the only suspended players not born in latin america. >> they're all either from the dominican republic. they invest billions of dollars in baseball academies in latin
. this is "special report". >>> good evening. we begin tonight with the confusing jobs picture in america. sometimes in washington and on the campaign trail you hear candidates calling for one armed economists. so those economists can't say on the one hand and on the other hand. in other words, you can use numbers to prove anything that is even remotely true. so as one key unemployment indicator hits a six-year low we take a closerer look at some of the arithmetic you don't often hear about. >> reporter: over the last four weeks jobless claims jobbed to 335,000 on average, the lowest average since november 2007. it is another sign coupled with last month's rate that the economy may be pulling out. >> i think the general pattern from this report, other data coming in is the economy is continuing to heal. >> reporter: another employment number may help to explain why businesses remain hesitant. it is the u-6 rate which includes under employment. it stands at 14.3%. >> we are in the fifth year of recovery and yet people are dropping out of the workforce. i have never seen that happen before. >> reporte
and in latin america. sometimes from countries that didn't exist in the world of empire, in the colonial world of 1913, 100 years ago, and 1914 at the start of the first world war. diplomats today represent governments, as they always have, but they also represent international institutions like the united nations. you fly the flag of the united nations here at chautauqua. they represent international institutions like the world bank and the international monetary fund. and i even think people who work for nonprofit organizations, who are dedicated to combating poverty, who want to promote economic development, who are promoting health care, who are trying to promote peace, i think they're diplomats too,. so in that vein think of bill and melinda gates and the enormously positive impact those two people and their foundation are ching on the fight against live aids, the fight to eradicate polio, which is nearly complete. only three countries in the world where polio exists these days. think of the champion figure skater michelle kwan. you saw her in the olympics. she's joined the state departme
:57, the least productive employees in america left washington for five weeks holiday. nice work if you can get it. ♪ >> the stakes couldn't be higher. >> there's a gone campaigning side outside the oval office. >> if i had poll numbers as low as his. >> how about a grand bargain for middle class jobs. >> no jobs bill, no budget bill. the threat of shutting down government. >> the one threatening to shut down the government is the president. >> majority leader. >> sit down and shut up, okay? >> 40 meaningless votes to repeal obama care. >> finally defund obama care. >> you're delivering no meaningful information. >> you're going to go back to your districts and explain. >> it's an aimless congress falling into chaos. >> it's pathetic. >> we're just slightly ahead of genghis kahn apartment communist party in popularity. >> i'm not the least bit concerned about what some might wand to describe as perception. >> i've run my last campaign. i don't need to spin. >> i'm sure the august recess will have our members in a better mood when they come back. ♪ ♪ holiday road, oh >>> ah, yes, it is tha
the face of gun violence in america as horrific as sandy hook was is not some suburban kid, it's a brown or black kid in the ghetto. if you look at chicago, chicago's on track for two sandy hooks per month. usually against another black person. yet chicago is about a third, a third and a third black, white and hispanic. why would so many murders come from the black community? the answer is so many kids come from parents without fathers. you look at violation, we're talking about gang-related kids, usually young kids. there was a documentary that my dad and i discussed in the book called resurrection, and it was about truth pack shakur. tupac shakur. and he said white people may like hearing me say this, but i know for a fact if i'd had a father in my life, i would have had discipline and confidence. and he went on to talk about the facth joid a did a father, he wanted structure, he wanted protection. and he went on to say in a way maybe a conservative right-winger might say that it is important for a boy to have a father in his life. a boy needs a father. tupac shakur said this. there's
that might cause the government to start looking over their shoulder. this is not the america that most of us grew up in and believe in. >> clayton: so when he -- when the president to tucker's point earlier says that we should trust the executive branch, we are doing everything in our power to make sure we are being transparent, it's simply not true there are two reasons why this is not true. number one is, they kept did from the american people. actually three reasons. the american people are important. they kept it from congress, also. and they kept the very things that the fisa court is supposed to oversee from the fisa court. the documents, the audit supposed to be presented to congress they never did. never gave it to the fisa court and american people don't know about it there is your transparency. >> not all democrats upset about it. the left wing of the democratic party to their great credit, ron why den, dennis kucinich, they're upset. >> alisyn: let's talk about other things that the president is doing that has certainly republicans upset. that is the president has basically decide
calling benghazi a phony scandal 78 percent said it's a serious situation and law americas are outraged at news at suspects have been charged in the attack including the alleged leader have not been arrested. >> according to public safety we have terrorist attack where ambassador and three americans have been murdered. he is roaming around libya libyan authorities haven't picked him up. why isn't he being interrogated why isn't he in custody. if it's important enough to charge him. it's ladies and gentlemened he has been involv-- it's alleged involved, why isn't he in custody? >> a wild police chase ends with a suspect's car crashing and then flipping over. take a look at this. >> he is going 206 to make-- he going to have to make a turn here. look at him on the dirt and through the fence and rolling. >> it happened in san fernando in the valley. a man accused behind the wheel accused of car jacking a kia van. after 20 minutes of driving he got out of the vehicle and then surrendered to police. >> also happening overnight we learned that more than a dozen animals have been removed from
channel. >> gregg: i'm gregg jarrett, welcome to a brand-new hour inside america news headquarters. >> heather: topping the news, 18 embassies are back open for business in the muslim world after a terror alert shut them down. our embassy in yemen and consulate in pakistan is still closed. we'll have a live report. >> gregg: one of three people missing in colorado found alive amid a massive flooding and mudslides there. our extreme weather center is tracking it all. >> heather: white house mexico releases the mastermind behind the killing of a dea agent. our legal panel breaks it all down. >> gregg: we begin with a fox news alert. new information on that dramatic rescue of a missing teenager, 16-year-old hannah anderson alive and safe and free at last now getting ready for an emotional reunion with her dad. her terrifying ordeal ended late yesterday when f.b.i. agents shot and killed the suspected kidnapper deep in the idaho wilderness. after a week long manhunt that sparked a multistate amber alert. will, what is the latest. >> reporter: we're about to hear from a key player in or
passed thus far in 2005, a trade agreement with central america, the first energy policy bill in decade, a multi-year highway bill. it was the last time the president and the congress had a multi-year funding bill. bill: you are argue he was active and relevant. >> you mentioned the approval rating. he's down 5 point in a month from july it was 47 percent. now it's up to 52. that's a jump of 5 points. >> president bush's approval ratings were low because of an unpopular war in iraq. president obama is supposedly winning the war against terrorism and the economy is recover and he's in his second term and there ought to be a brief moment of below but there hasn't been. bill: if that is the case, what is the calculation between joe biden and hillary clinton? dose wait to see what she does or does he get in regardless? >> i think he gets in regardless. there is nothing to be lost by anybody. o'malley, the governor of maryland. there is no disadvantage to them going to iowa in this early stage and start to poke around and build relationships and flesh out their messages. there they don't kno
is america's last great hope. >> i will tell you something else about t.w. shannon, we spent some time on the road, obviously very articulate, but he is also pretty tough on an airplane with turbulence. i fly just about every other day, so i can take a lot, but there are some times when the plane is going crazy. he is one of these guys who is just turning the page on the newspaper when things are going i respect him for that very much. okay, karen? >> a pleasure to be here. my involvement with women in politics stems from and internships i had in washington, d.c. for one of my home state senators, senator lugar from indiana. that was my first time being around a lot of conservative women who were smart, ambitious, and wanted to have families and careers, and we were trying to figure that all out. feminist voices were not reaching a lot of them, were not reaching me as a young woman. so when i went back to the university of virginia for my third year of undergrad, i sought out an environment what i found in d.c., smart and ambitious woman who wanted to talk about the issues of the day a
then will america do? what will iran do? what will russia do but i started off, mr. speaker, by making a reference for the first world war, next year we are going to be commemorating the stinking great of the events of august 1914. and those events have a worrying parallel because you have a series of actions and reactions which drew in an escalating fashion one country after another. nobody thought that the assassination of an obscure archduke woodley toward world event. this is a powder keg and we should not be lobbing weapons into the heart of such combustible material. >> we will break away from this british house of commons debate on syria at this point. were expected this debate to continue for several hours with possible votes later today. taking a look at democratic congressman saying there's no vital national security involved, even if it's in government has proved to deliver did use chemical weapons, which -- republican scott wigle tweets what's happening right now in british parliament should be happening in the u.s. congress. moral issue. is a death caused by chemical weapons wors were
for president obama in 2008 the first time with the sincere expectation his election would make america more popular around the globe. that hasn't happened. why? >> it hasn't happened. the president said he was going to remake america's image in the world. i think a lot of people thought because he did have a charismatic personality, certainly the president himself believes himself to be charismatic, he was going to be able to win more friends for america, that america would suddenly be beloved by all. what the president seems not to understand, what is most important in terms of a country's standing is that you are respected not necessarily liked. so the president's effort to make everyone like us i think has made us look weak. >> so it's had the opposite effect? >> that's exactly right. what's happened is, the united states is perceived as, first of all, tenuous about making decisions. we had what happened in egypt, for example, the administration was really i think very slow and has still been slow to understand the muslim brotherhood was not democratic. we had the president drawing lines
brothers had gone on a brothers trip to latin america and they had discovered these extremely high quality popsicles. popsicles you think. a financier getting in popsicles? but not as an investor, as an owner of the business. and so he at his kitchen table sleeping on his brother's sofa to conserve money started making these popsicles and selling them at festivals and fairs and things like that. and now he's got a real business. and steve works like one million hours a week. i know there's only 168 hours a week. one of the things about being an entrepreneur, you have to do something you love, something you believe in, and then you've got to commit to it all in. and he is -- i went to his business, and i helped make popsicles recently. >> oh, really? >> yeah. so i could talk to all the employees, find out what it's like. the morale is fantastic and my favorite is banana pudding. the banana pudding pop is so good i can't believe it. they do all fresh ingredient, not my find of price point. guess how much one popsicle costs? >> i'm going to tell you because i have had that, too, and the key l
. another alleged sports doper speaking out. will alex rodriguez fess up or keep fighting. >>> and america goes on high alert. the latest on how real the threat may be. >>> a chilling look through the eyes of an assassin. lost track of how many he's murders. an american teen takes us inside the ruthless drug cartel he killed for starting at just 15 years old. >>> we begin with the biggest forced doping story since lance armstrong. number 5 on the all-time home run list signing autographs today. once denied using steroids then denied using them after 2003 now suspended for using them since then, tied to a south florida anti-aging clinic biogenesis. a-rod drew a 211 game suspension without pay and today spoke to reporters. >> i'm fighting for my life. i have to defend myself. if i don't defend myself no one else will. >> the suspension takes affect thursday. he can play during his appeal. joining us in a bristol, connecticut, and the lead reporter on the story since its developed over the past few weeks. jason, a rough day for alex baseball? and major league >> reporter: absolutely without q
says america isn't free and runs off to china and russia detail about us is not my idea of a great american patriot. but i think the issue is worth looking at. but i do put a lot of trust in people that defended the united states of america for their entire careers, 30 and 40 years, with distinction and with honor and with valor, put their lives on the line for the country. when they walk in and tell me, this is what it is and we're not doing this and we're not doing that, we're not doing this, and asking me questions, then i've got to know more than that before cure the rot. fortunately congress will keep looking at this and that's the one good thing that's come out of it. it will continue to be in the press and in the scrutiny. you know, like you, always worry about concentrations of power and individual liberty. i think that's what keeps america free. is that individual citizens are passionate about that and their series about that. at the same time you've got to see the abuses, you've got to know where they are. and i don't think that communism we lost our freedom. if we had we
.m. eastern here on cing span 3. c-span2. >> c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979, brought to you as a public service by your it's provider -- by your television provider. >> host: and this week on "the communicators," gordon smith who is president and ceo of the national association of broadcasters, our guest reporter is paul kirby of telecommunications report. senator smith, you started at nab nearly four years ago. how have the issues changed in those four years? >> guest: well, it seems like the issues just keep on coming, and they tend to be very major issues affecting both radio and television. but clearly on the radio side, the whole issue of performance rights, performance tax, whatever you want to tribe it as, is an ongoing challenge. hopefully, the day will arrive when both the digital and the terrestrial platform can come up with a model that actually grows music and works for both. but right now one has an unsustainable business model, and the other one works for radio, but on the other hand, we need it to work for the performers too. but if you provide a rate t
of them. there you have it, america. >> i did a morning show before this one, local new york station, 12 years. one time i missed the show. didn't set the alarm. alarm doesn't ring if you don't set it. >> won't wake you up. >> i woke up so late. there was no chance of salvaging my time. one in 12 years. >> one in 39. that's all right. >> quite a record. >> beyonce is so cool. she has a concert at barclay center. in brooklyn. she bikes. bikes over the brooklyn bridge. incognito. what she was wearing. she instagrammed to prove it. blue t-shirt covered in white stars, cut off shorts. and some shades. there it is. all right. she biked all the way to her show. right across the bridge. and jay-z, her husband, unannounced cameo at the show. so, pretty cool. >> bike on the way to your superstar show. >> giving love to disney the parent company of abc news. released the trailer of "muppets most wanted" a sequel to the hit that rejuvenated the franchise. in 2011. anyway, here's your trailer. it is so cute. ♪ >> i'll show you all the moves. like jagger i've got the moves like jagger ♪ >> the mu
another key part of the new healthcare law. why would that be? i'm bill hemmer. welcome to america's newsroom. you came back to more pain. martha: would you like me to leave again? it's raining outside. there is no reason not to be at work. every day there is a new delay it seems, what provision under the law that's supposed to set limit on everyone's out of pocket costs and the white house put that off for a year. ththe limit was not supposed to exceed $6,350 for an individual, $12,700 for a family. bill: now insurers can set a higher limit or no limit at all. what's this all about? >> reporter: apparently it's about computers. they say we didn't have the computer systems in place. we need another year. in the meantime people watching the show you could probably end up paying more out of pocket expenses. some of these insurance policies could have no limit at all. bill: i thought the law was designed to help the uninsured. >> this is the second major thing that's been tweaked. they also got rid of the employer penalty. big businesses don't have to pay a penalty. and you still have
for a brand new shopping experience. petsmart®. >>> america's drinking habits are changing. apple apple cider is cutting into beer sales. good morning, ray zbhood morning. great to be here. >> what's going on? >> it's crazy. the last time cider was popular was about 1760. it's suddenly taken off again. partly it's appealing to a younger audience. partly the beer market is saturated. it's hard to grow it in the u.s. cider is creeping in. it also appeals to women much more than men and it's gluten free which is a big topic. >> it also sounds like if you're a wine drinker, white wine drinker, this is good. >> you get apple obviously and floral notes. that's quite directly pitched by their markets department saying this is a great alternative to white wines. >> it's the beer companies. it was a hard market to begin with and in the past year all of the big companies have jumped in in. >> what have they got in front of us? >> i think we needed to get to that part. >> i haven't seen apple juice -- >> our second president john adams liked to have cider for breakfast. the fi
. they've added skateboards. >>eric: america's youth. they're not wasting their time. that's great. the sequel pool trick shot now featuring 11 guys, a head stand and a skateboard. that's pretty incredible. these guys are incredible. that's a new olympic sport. >>gretchen: you know what? >>clayton: not done yet. >>gretchen: come on! >>clayton: and in a speedo no less. >>gretchen: fantastic. we've got them on the show. >>eric: last night a man fell to his death at turner field in atlanta. the late-breaking details, let's go live to the stadium. >> good morning. certainly a tragic morning here in atlanta. the braves were playing against the philadelphia phillies. the game just started because there had been did a two-hour rain delay when the accident occurred. according to atlanta police this man not yet identified fell from the upper 400-level concourse where they basically sell concessions, hot dogs, beer, things like that, and he plummeted 60, 65 feet or about six stories to his death into a secure parking lot, parking lot where the players actually park their cars. at this point
. unconstitutional. it goes against what america's founding fathers have said. >> that is a great question. prism program is largely classified. there has been some talk about it. i have to be careful with what i say. the bottom line is, there are too many people in congress right now who are forgetting that there is a constitution that restricts what they do. the point of the constitution is to restrict what the federal government does. in the name of security, they are forgetting that their first right or the is to protect liberties. that is why we have a government to ensure that we have liberty as a people. that is what they are forgetting. they are focused solely on the security aspect. ory think as long as the nsa some other agency is stopping bad guys, they can go after collecting information on all sorts of people and have no consequences. of course, there is a huge threat to that. we do not want the government to have this kind of data to use against americans in the future. >> yeah. about,'m also worried like, all the gay rights stuff. i'm thinking, like, this could be like the racism t
details right now. calls to boycott russia's olympics over the anti-gay laws. . no wonder volt is america's best-selling plug-in. that's american ingenuity to find new roads. right now, get a 2013 chevrolet volt for around $269 per month. ♪ honey, we need to talk. we do? i took the trash out. i know. and thank you so much for that. i think we should get a medicare supplement insurance plan. right now? [ male announcer ] whether you're new to medicare or not, you may know it only covers about 80% of your part b medical expenses. it's up to you to pay the difference. so think about an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan, insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company. like all standardized medicare supplement insurance plans, they help cover some of what medicare doesn't pay. i did a little research. with a medicare supplement plan, you'll be able to stay with your doctor. oh, you know, i love that guy. mm-hmm. [ male announcer ] these types of plans let you visit any doctor or hospital that accepts medicare patients. and there are no networks. is this a one-size-fits-all kind of thing
to friday. back to "america's newsroom." >> i'm browne here for martha maccallum. they said it is out of caution and not related to the original threat. bill: we expect the president to address some specific concerns in a news conference from the white house. here is press secretary jay carney late yesterday on that. >> when it comes to protecting americans serving in our embassies and facilities around the world, it is very important to take the necessary precautions when there is this kind of credible threat information. bill: greg palkot leads our coverage. he's working the story out of london today. what is the latest out of pakistan, greg. >> reporter: that's right, bill. we were talking just a short while ago with officials at the u.s. embassy in islamabad, pakistan. they had confirm ad drawdown of what they called non-emergency personnel from the u.s. consulate in lahore. that is about 180 miles southeast of islamabad. that personnel is in fact being brought up to islamabad in that capital area. they also confirmed to us that it was all due to a specific threat against that ins
. >> nobody in america is getting those benefits. >> you're exactly right. you don't get the benefits and you don't get the subsidies. the government, i.e., you, the taxpayer, mark simone, have to subsidize this fabulous plan for members of congress and their staffs. >> that was the quickest action i've ever seen from the federal government when they thought they would have it --? they were panicked. >> tell us the reason that everybody else gets away with it. >> i have to get out of here. our panel was great tonight and nan hayworth and mark simone and everybody campaign for nan hayworth because she won't say a bad word. thanks, everybody. i'm kudlow. i'll be back monday. i sometimes do say bad words. have a great weekend, everybody. u to eat more fiber. chewy, oatie, gooeyness... and fraudulence. i'm in deep, babe. you certainly are. [ male announcer ] fiber one. all your important legal matters in just minutes. protect your family... and launch your dreams. at legalzoom.com we put the law on your side. [ sirens wailing ] >> a war is raging in mexico's border towns as rival drug cartels bat
. >> translator: i call on every muslim on every spot on earth to stop the crimes of america and its allies against the muslims in palestine, iraq, afghanistan, yemen, mali, and everywhere. >> emily schmidt joining us from washington. emily, clearly the obama administration feels that something is up here, but specifically do we know what led them to pull the trigger on closing these embassies? >> we have a couple of different ways to pull back the curtain for you. first of all, with what we've been reporting, officials have been tracking this knowledge they said for weeks, but in the past few days they say the chatter was simply increasing enough to believe that al qaeda in the arabian peninsula in yemen could be in the final stages of planning an unspecified attack. this morning the white house tells cnn though it's not going to comment on intelligence in this case, particularly as it relates to a "new york times" report that says some of this intelligence came from intercepted electronic communications between senior al qaeda operatives. this article notes that's one of the main function
does the program under the prior statute to protect america act look at this exact mechanism of targeting persons overseas and held it against the constitutional challenge. that's why it hasn't been reported a very much but that is an opinion of the court review, arbuckle three that have looked at the program and said that it is unlawful. it's hard for me to imagine an oversight regime that would exceed that. the problem -- >> i don't think you are using that -- >> you have to look at the core to -- court. we were prosecutors and seat to get a first warrant. you go to the judge and present the facts and i am not aware of any country in the world that has anything like the court so you could make it adversarial and slow it down and rest. the problem i think is there's a lack of confidence. it is somewhere below headlights and above right now. >> it's hard for us because in the community we depend on the relationship with the intelligence committee to provide the legitimacy that we need in the program to carry them forward. >> where is the abuse? ayaan understand some people th
is encouraged in dorsett. >> i like meeting future mayors and future candidates of america. >> reporter: like most big shots bobby has a chauffeur. >> he was in london, germany. that's crazy. my 4-year-old is a world traveller before me. >> reporter: what time do mayors go to bed? >> 8:00. >> reporter: probing interviewers take a back seat to bugs and burtflies. >> i'm getting the dragon fly i see. >> reporter: i have had a lot of guys get up from interviews with me. >> i will give you my bestest. >> reporter: give me your bestest. hokey smokes, that went a mile. the mayor unwinds with his rod and reel on local lakes teeming with fish. give it a nice cast. >> oh! >> reporter: you got a little bass. >> yeah. >> reporter: a little bass there. >> doesn't have any -- >> reporter: gently put him in. that fish was two feet long, right? >> 50. >> reporter: 50 feet long? now you sound like a politician. sadly, after a dip in the lake it's nap time and we take our leave. >> my name is robert and i approve this message. >> reporter: bobby won't kiss your baby but he'll kiss your fish. you're a good may
, the central social problem in america. >> host: next call for mr. elder, we have about seven minutes left in our program. dennis in sharon, massachusetts. hi, dennis. dennis? >> caller: yes. can you hear me? yes -- >> host: please go ahead. >> caller: okay, great. i'm a great fan of c-span. i watch booktv every weekend. my father was born in 1892, i was his first son. when i was born, he was in 60 years old. he left macon, georgia, as he told we because he saw a black man being burned in the fountain of downtown macon, georgia. the point i would like to make is that i really believe it's, obviously, the father being in the household is a tremendous service to the children, without a doubt. but most importantly i really believe this thing about mind power. having the focus in order to be able to have a discipline to achieve what your goals are in life. the other thing i want to say is that there's a psychological underpinning that i believe hardly anybody talks about in which people aspire to be the anti-antihero. so a lot of this outburst that we see is really someone who really believes
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